SENIOR HOSTEL •  BOYS
 SENIOR HOSTEL •  GIRLS
 JUNIOR HOSTEL
Oudtshoorn High School is the proud product of the Boys High and Girls High Schools which were originally founded more than 100 years ago. These two institutions grew over decades with the town and proudly sent hundreds of responsible young people into adult life. The two schools were amalgamated during 1963 and Oudtshoorn High School has steadfastly extended the beautiful traditions inherited from both. Our ex-pupils have done their alma mater proud in various spheres of public life in South Africa.

Hoërskool Oudtshoorn het sy oorsprong in die voormalige Hoër Seuns- en Hoër Meisieskool wat beide meer as 100 jaar gelede in die dorp tot stand gekom het. Hierdie inrigtings het deur die dekades saam met die dorp ontwikkel en duisende jongmense met trots die volwasse lewe ingestuur. In 1963 het die twee skole geamalgameer en sedertdien is met toewyding voortgebou op die pragtige tradisies van albei. Baie van ons oudleerders het reeds op 'n wye verskeidenheid terreine bydraes gelewer tot die ontwikkeling van die Republiek van Suid Afrika.

Accommodation is available to boys and girls in two separate and comfortable residences viz Archer House for boys and Pinehurst for girls. We also have a Junior Hostel for Primary School children.

Dedicated staff will create a second home for learners in these residences. Provision is also made for primary school learners.  Boarding fees These fees are determined annually according to running costs. Fees are quarterly payable, in advance.   Application for Admission Application forms for admission and for residential bursaries are available from the school or individual residences. If such an application is successful, the parent will receive a list of necessities as well as residence regulations.  Should you have any further enquiries, you are most welcome to contact us. Contact Ida at jsch@telkomsa.net (Pinehurst) and for Huis Archer Susan Sel: 0823906070 or e-mail: pinehurstk@gmail.com

Old Girls High Reunion

 15 "Old Girls' Highers" at the CP Nel Museum


We are searching for all Girls' High Alma Mater and teachers
The ball has been set rolling this past week to hold a BIG reunion for all Girls' High ex-students and teachers on 2-4 October 2009 in Oudtshoorn. This was the result of a gathering of 15 "Old Girls' Highers" at the CP Nel Museum to lay a foundation to the project to display the history of this exceptional school. The excitement bubbled over and this reunion has been planned, hopefully to coincide with the official opening of the exhibition at the CP Nel Museum.

Hazel (Gibson) Jonker is taking the lead with this project and she requests that all ladies who attended the Girls' High School (they did not necessarily have had to have matriculated there) make contact with the persons listed below in order that a list of contact numbers and addresses can be compiled. Anyone who knows of ex-students of Girls' High School, please make contact with one of the individuals listed below.

Contact Persons: 
Hazel [Gibson] Jonker 0826518037 / hazel@opsa.co.za 
Dave van der Walt 082-7734901 / dave@oudhs.wcape.school.za

The history of Pinehurst

Historical Ostrich palace Hostel

In 1850 William Edmeades with his family came to settle on the farm Zeekoegat close to the Olifants River near Oudtshoorn. The eldest son George Mason Edmeades started his career as a painter in Oudtshoorn. In 1860 after the death of his father he took over responsibilities for the family. He was a shrewd business-man and in 1863 had his own shop, smithy, and wagon-building firm in Oudtshoorn. As his other five brothers grew up he took them in as partners.
One of the brothers, Edwin T.L later became a well-known farmer, member of the Town Council, Mayor, member of the Divisional Council and candidate for the Legislative Council. In 1911 he decided to build a double-storeyed villa residence on plot 365 in West Bank. Mr. VIXSEBOXSE designed the villa in the Dutch Transvaal Neo-Renaissance style. The tender of Mr. A. Rogers for the erection of the building was accepted and Vixseboxse acted as Clerk of Works. Mr. Edmeades personally supervised the work to make sure that every task was carried out to perfection. Noteworthy is the reddish purple sandstone that was used for the key pattern cornerstones and window sills that form a constrast to the lighter grey tint sandstone of the walls. Vixseboxse's design for Pinehurst differs from those of BULLOCK and other architects of that period in that he made very little use of cast-iron pillars and brackets. This is clearly to be seen at Pinehurst. The balconies rest on sandstone doric pillars while the balcony railings are of carpenter's lace teak-woodwork. The brackets to the balcony pillars and pillars are of teak and pinewood respectively.
One of the main features of the interior of the house is the four beautiful sandstone/teak fire-places. Each one of the fireplaces is decorated with 108 delft tiles with 17th and 18th century merchant ship and windmill designs. The other fireplaces are of white, white-and-black marble decorated with colourful green and yellow tiles with variations of the French lily in the Art Nouveau. Brass decorated plates add to the beauty of the fireplaces. The floors of the main entrance hall and corridors are covered with parquet flooring wood tiles of teak and oakwood. The ceilings of the residence are of pine in contrast to the pattern pressed paper mache and steelplate of most of C. Bullock's designs. In the interior of the building selected teak, yellow-wood and oak were used for the staircase, doors and wall panelling. Very little stained colour glass was used in the windows. The municipal valuation for the residence in 1912 was £10 000. In 1926 the Edmeades family sold Pinehurst to the Public Works Department to be used as a Training College hostel for ladies. After completion of a new ladies' hostel next to the College it was made part of the new Mens' hostel 'Pinehurst'.
The building was declared a National Monument in 1966.
(Ferreira 1983:36-37)
(SA Panorama Nov 1984)
All truncated references not fully cited below are those of Joanna Walker's original text and cited in full in the 'Bibliography' entry of the Lexicon.